Christian Storm

Flight of Idioms

Q. Please introduce yourself.


I'm Christian Storm, a self-taught painter and muralist.

Q. How did you become an artist?


I originally wanted to become an architect, but I went to a business school because of the grades and eventually ended up working at an interior design company. Though it secured my life, it was too ordinary and boring compared to what I did at night - painting graffitis. So it was like a suit and tie during the day and a black hoodie after work. My friend named me "Storm" to reflect a bit of my temper back then, climbing over the walls to paint on the street and breaking my limbs by jumping off the rooftop. (was never caught, though, haha) I was sponsored by the spraypaint company while representing them in Europe, which allowed me to paint freely in many different places. That was a transition phase from corporate life to independence, always getting ready to take a leap.

Q. What is your signature style?


Letters and names are the prime topics of my work, which started from learning sign-writings during corporate life. But letters can be tedious, too, when you do it for ten years, so I take inspiration from architecture, observing its elements and ambiance while making them into geometric elements, and so on. Though I was self-taught, I try to learn new things every day; there is no time when you are truly resting - you have to constantly come up with ideas, think about the next moves, and be ready for what may come next.

Q. How do you select the location and the subject of your work?


It all depends on the theme and situation. It's not like working with a client since graffiti is about freely expressing yourself, soaked in the adrenaline. So I always look for a spot wherever I go, asking landlords for permission. 8 out of 10 times, I'd get rejected, but I don't take them personally and move on to the next spot. Also, graffiti is meant to be temporary - it is about the excitement of the moment, so I try to focus on it. 

Q. How was it working with SEVEN EIGHT UNDER?

Residues, or rather, marginalized things, captivate my eyes naturally. In the case of the Panorama Creatures exhibition work, I approached it with a desire to revive something worthless and discarded. For the Euljiro Collection, I recorded images that would be forgotten in a rapidly changing time. I get the feeling that such a context repeats itself over and over again within me.

Q. What did you focus on when creating this work? 

I prioritized making a balance, not overshadowing the shoe design, as the original was already brilliant. I wanted to compliment the shoe by adding a signature pattern of my work with a strong impact with the bright neon color. It was similar to painting graffiti in the streets since I strived to see how my work could complement the scenery and the location, making it a part of society.

Q. Compared to the experience you had all around the world, is there any unique aspect of the graffiti scene in Korea?

Despite the population in Korea is bigger than Denmark, the graffiti scene here is much smaller. But more designers are now using graffiti to create a certain identity, so there is a good balance between mainstream and underground. But still, I'm curious to see more artists who stay true to the roots of graffiti, keeping it in its natural style.

Q. Where would you go in your SEVEN EIGHT UNDER Sneakers?

Since I've added neon colors that could shine bright under UV lights, it'd be perfect for clubbing or a nice night out. Of course, they would go well with exhibitions or art/design fairs, too.

Q. Lastly, would you share a piece of advice or encouragement to the people who "keep marching for their dreams"?

Don't give up. Listen to yourself and keep marching for what you dream of. If you give up now, you might lose the opportunity and the blessing to come. Don't restrict yourself to others; keep exploring new ideas and traveling as much as possible. You are not alone - someone will understand and love what you do.

Christian Storm
Flight of Idioms

Q. Please introduce yourself.

I'm Christian Storm, a self-taught painter and muralist.

Q. How did you become an artist?

I originally wanted to become an architect, but I went to a business school because of the grades and eventually ended up working at an interior design company. Though it secured my life, it was too ordinary and boring compared to what I did at night - painting graffitis. So it was like a suit and tie during the day and a black hoodie after work. My friend named me "Storm" to reflect a bit of my temper back then, climbing over the walls to paint on the street and breaking my limbs by jumping off the rooftop. (was never caught, though, haha) I was sponsored by the spraypaint company while representing them in Europe, which allowed me to paint freely in many different places. That was a transition phase from corporate life to independence, always getting ready to take a leap.

Q. What is your signature style?

Letters and names are the prime topics of my work, which started from learning sign-writings during corporate life. But letters can be tedious, too, when you do it for ten years, so I take inspiration from architecture, observing its elements and ambiance while making them into geometric elements, and so on. Though I was self-taught, I try to learn new things every day; there is no time when you are truly resting - you have to constantly come up with ideas, think about the next moves, and be ready for what may come next.

Q. How do you select the location and the subject of your work?

It all depends on the theme and situation. It's not like working with a client since graffiti is about freely expressing yourself, soaked in the adrenaline. So I always look for a spot wherever I go, asking landlords for permission. 8 out of 10 times, I'd get rejected, but I don't take them personally and move on to the next spot. Also, graffiti is meant to be temporary - it is about the excitement of the moment, so I try to focus on it.

Q. How was it working with SEVEN EIGHT UNDER?

Residues, or rather, marginalized things, captivate my eyes naturally. In the case of the Panorama Creatures exhibition work, I approached it with a desire to revive something worthless and discarded. For the Euljiro Collection, I recorded images that would be forgotten in a rapidly changing time. I get the feeling that such a context repeats itself over and over again within me.

Q. What did you focus on when creating this work?

I prioritized making a balance, not overshadowing the shoe design, as the original was already brilliant. I wanted to compliment the shoe by adding a signature pattern of my work with a strong impact with the bright neon color. It was similar to painting graffiti in the streets since I strived to see how my work could complement the scenery and the location, making it a part of society.

Q. Compared to the experience you had all around the world, is there any unique aspect of the graffiti scene in Korea?

Despite the population in Korea is bigger than Denmark, the graffiti scene here is much smaller. But more designers are now using graffiti to create a certain identity, so there is a good balance between mainstream and underground. But still, I'm curious to see more artists who stay true to the roots of graffiti, keeping it in its natural style.

Q. Lastly, would you share a piece of advice or encouragement to the people who "keep marching for their dreams"?

Don't give up. Listen to yourself and keep marching for what you dream of. If you give up now, you might lose the opportunity and the blessing to come. Don't restrict yourself to others; keep exploring new ideas and traveling as much as possible. You are not alone - someone will understand and love what you do.

Q. Is there any distinctive difference between making petite figure clothing and regular clothing?

Since figures cannot style themselves, the makers should approach their styling like sculptures. Figure costume sizes are in 1/6 scale, but it's essential to cater it to the characteristics of the figure. It is about more than just reducing the size.


PF. KAKAO
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PF. KAKAO
78under
CONTACT
1877-5784

ADDRESS
702, 7F B-DONG, 59, SEONGSUIL-RO 8-GIL, SEONGDONG-GU, SEOUL


OFFICIAL@78UNDER.COM

BANK INFO
KEBHana Bank 210-910041-84004

FOLLOW

COMPANY

MAIL-ORDER LICENSE

BUSINESS LICENSE

CHIEF PRIVACY OFFICER

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER


Hosting Service Provider

Imweb Corp.


© Copyrights 2022. Seven Eight Under all rights reserved.
The content may not be published, rewritten or redistributed.